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Archive for the ‘Miscellaneous’ Category

Ooops……

When I posted the article about the Durango Fire Hall, I forgot this little beauty.

Mt. Albert included this little chemical fire extinguisher from Aspen Modeling Company along with their fire hall kit.

It measures about an inch and a half tall, and is composed of cast plastic parts. I pre-painted all the parts, and used CA adhesive and Zip Kicker to assemble it.

This was one of the first items I built with the kit. I set it aside on a shelf in my workshop, and totally forgot about it!

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The DVD that Steve Mitchell of Yard Goat Images and I shot last January in Colorado is finally ready for a pre-release. I met with Steve today, and he gave me a number of copies at what he calls his distributor price. He also gave me permission to sell these at a discount to friends and family. For obvious reasons, he requested that I not advertise the discounted price, but if you would like one, please contact me at my e-mail address    Some of you saw the DVD that I made from my video alone; this finished version, with the work of both cameramen, is twice as spectacular.  If you like steam trains and western scenery, this is one DVD you are definitely going to want in your collection.

Here is the other DVD that I am holding in the post above. Steve Mitchell of Yard Goat Images and I shot this in January of 2013 in Colorado. Some of you saw the DVD that I made from my video alone; this finished version, with the work of both cameramen, is twice as spectacular. If you like steam trains and western scenery, this is one DVD you are definitely going to want in your collection.

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Mad City Train Show 2016

Last weekend I went with my friend, Steve Mitchell, to the Mad City Model Railroad Show in Madison, Wisconsin. I have sometimes shot video for Steve's DVDs, and I like to help him with these shows. I'm holding two of the videos that I did a lot of work on.

Last weekend I went with my friend, Steve Mitchell, to the Mad City Model Railroad Show in Madison, Wisconsin. I have sometimes shot video for Steve’s DVDs, and I like to help him with these shows. I’m holding two of the videos that I did a lot of work on. I posted articles on both these videos when they first came out, and I have reproduced those postings below.

 

For five years, from 2004 to 2008, I had a Christmas train layout under our tree using Bachmann's On30 equipment. That's where I fell in love with the scale. The only problem was that each January, the layout had to be packed away until the following Christmas season. Although it had a pretty complex track arrangement, and two levels, it was made with Lemax Village buildings and people. Their buildings are OK for what they are, and are generally speaking quarter inch scale, but their figures are closer to G-scale, and I had some 1:32 scale automobiles on it. All in all, it was OK for a Christmas display, but it wasn't a real model railroad. I had done some video pieces of it every year because I like doing that kind of thing. In January of 2009 I knew I was going to be able to start on a real model railroad, so I made a farewell video, using all of the tricks at my command. I arranged special lighting for all of the scenes. I placed theatrical gels over the camera lens to simulate dusk and night. I had a small fog machine that generated a pretty good blowing snow effect, and I did some "camera-on-flatcar" shots. I even plotted the suggestion of a story. Jump forward to July of 2013. My friend Steve Mitchell, of Yard Goat Images, e-mailed me to see if I'd like to make a commercial release of my 2008 Christmas train video. I pounced on the idea, and we spent the next five or six weeks re-editing the video, tightening up the story, re-scoring the music, and adding all new sound effects. The finished product is the DVD, "The Last Train to Christmasville", which is now available on Steve's web site, yardgoatimages.com. The running time is about 30 minutes, and the price is $15.00. The preview of it can be seen on the web site, or at U-Tube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mbu1Qyr-C3k Young children love to watch trains, and I really think "The Last Train to Christmasville" turned out to be a delightful product for young children, ages toddler up to middle school, so if you have any kids that age in your life, your own, grandchildren, nieces or nephews, I'd strongly urge you to consider it for a Christmas gift.

For five years, from 2004 to 2008, I had a Christmas train layout under our tree using Bachmann’s On30 equipment. That’s where I fell in love with the scale. The only problem was that each January, the layout had to be packed away until the following Christmas season.
Although it had a pretty complex track arrangement, and two levels, it was made with Lemax Village buildings and people. Their buildings are OK for what they are, and are generally speaking quarter inch scale, but their figures are closer to G-scale, and I had some 1:32 scale automobiles on it. All in all, it was OK for a Christmas display, but it wasn’t a real model railroad. I had done some video pieces of it every year because I like doing that kind of thing.
In January of 2009 I knew I was going to be able to start on a real model railroad, so I made a farewell video, using all of the tricks at my command. I arranged special lighting for all of the scenes. I placed theatrical gels over the camera lens to simulate dusk and night. I had a small fog machine that generated a pretty good blowing snow effect, and I did some “camera-on-flatcar” shots. I even plotted the suggestion of a story.
Jump forward to July of 2013. My friend Steve Mitchell, of Yard Goat Images, e-mailed me to see if I’d like to make a commercial release of my 2008 Christmas train video. I pounced on the idea, and we spent the next five or six weeks re-editing the video, tightening up the story, re-scoring the music, and adding all new sound effects. The finished product is the DVD, “The Last Train to Christmasville”, which is now available on Steve’s web site, yardgoatimages.com.
The running time is about 30 minutes, and the price is $15.00.
Young children love to watch trains, and I really think “The Last Train to Christmasville” turned out to be a delightful product for young children, ages toddler up to middle school, so if you have any kids that age in your life, your own, grandchildren, nieces or nephews, I’d strongly urge you to consider it for a Christmas gift.

 

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Allow me first to apologize to all my regular subscribers, and especially to the new subscribers who continue to sign up, despite the dearth of recent postings.

Allow me first to apologize to all my regular subscribers, and especially to the new subscribers who continue to sign up, despite the dearth of recent postings. I could go on and on with reasons and excuses for neglecting my railroad and my web site, and many of those would be very valid, but the bottom line is that I owe my subscribers more content. One thing that has been holding me up has been the depth of that Durango section of the layout. I finally bit the bullet, and decided to eliminate the turn-back curve in Durango. This will bring most of the trackwork to within three feet of the fascia vs. the four foot reach that was there with the turn-back curve. Double click the photo above for an enlarged look. In order to preserve continuous running on a part of the layout, I added a cross-over on the far right side of the track diagram. I took out the San Fransisco style armstrong turn table for the Durango trolley. That was never going to be more than cosmetic, and I’m using the Tam Valley Train Shuttle to control the trolley anyway.

On a more exciting note,

On a more exciting note, I am traveling to Sweden next week, and I’ll be visiting Troels Kirk and his famous Coast Line RR. In e-mails with Troels a couple of years ago, I discovered he lived fairly close to my Swedish cousin, and he invited me to stop by the next time I was in Sweden. I’ll post something about my visit when I get back….and I promise to make more progress on the D,D&SRR later this summer.

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Steve Mitchell and I attended the big railroad show in Madison, Wisconsin this past weekend. I sometimes volunteer with Steve's company, Yard Goat Images, Yard Goat

Steve Mitchell and I attended the big railroad show in Madison, Wisconsin, this past weekend. I sometimes volunteer with Steve’s company, Yard Goat Images, to help with videography or with shows like this. Here is the quiet before the storm at the Alliant Energy Center on Friday night during set up for the show.

Here is Steve in front of the two tables that comprise his vendor's location.

This is Steve in front of the two tables that comprise his vendor’s location.

9:00 am Saturday morning the doors open. By 5:00 pm Sunday night, over 10,000 people will have attended the show.

9:00 am Saturday morning the doors open.

By 5:00 pm Sunday night, over 10,000 people will have attended the show.

By 5:00 pm Sunday night, over 10,000 people will have attended the show, which featured 29 layouts, 3 clinics, 20 exhibitors and 69 vendors.

Layouts ran the gamut from small dioramas like this one....

Layouts ran the gamut from small dioramas like this one in HO scale….

....to large scale masterpieces like this one from the G Whiz Gang....

….to large scale masterpieces like this one from the G Whiz Gang.

In between there were little jewels like this suitcase train....

In between there were little jewels like this suitcase train….

....and some nicely detailed modular layouts.

….and some nicely detailed modular layouts.

Exhibitors included several museums and historical societies.....

Exhibitors included several museums and historical societies…..

....and the National Model Railroad Association.

….and the National Model Railroad Association.

There was the usual selection of vintage railroad equipment.

There was the usual selection of vintage railroad equipment…..

....and structures of all shapes and sizes.

….and structures of all shapes and sizes.

Children were not overlooked. This young man is fascinated by a garden railway set-up.

Children were not overlooked. This young man is fascinated by a garden railway set-up…..

....and the circus train was a popular ride.

….and the circus train was a popular ride.

Anyone for a cup of coffee? Fuel your day with purpose at chapincoffee.com.

Anyone for a cup of coffee? Fuel your day with purpose at chapincoffee.com.

The G-scale circus train is always an eye-catcher.

The G-scale circus train is always an eye-catcher.

How about this 7.5 inch gauge stock car, over6 feet long!

How about this 7.5 inch gauge stock car, over 6 feet long!

Anyone have room for a helix this big?

Anyone have room for a helix this big?

Last but not least, I always look forward to seeing my friend, John Drechsler, from Milwaukee.

Last but not least, I always look forward to seeing my friend, John Dreschler, from Milwaukee.

He creates some of the most detailed scratch-built structures and rolling stock in On30 that I have ever seen.

He creates some of the most detailed scratch-built structures and rolling stock in On30 that I have ever seen. Here is a logging camp bunk car he was working on.

 

 

 

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The workshop in my garage has been completed for a couple of weeks now.

The workshop in my garage has been completed for a couple of weeks now. I attached six shelves to the wall facing into the garage to help with storage. There is still room for my Mazda Miata, but when I purchase a new car, a Toyota Prius, I will probably have to remove the bottom three shelves to make it fit in the garage.

The inside of the workshop did hold everything.

The inside of the workshop did hold everything.

It is crowded, but at least it is warm. A small enclosed oil heater visible in the rear of this picture keeps the temperature at a constant 50-60 degrees F, and I can make it warmer when I'm working.

It is crowded, but at least it’s warm. A small enclosed oil heater visible in the rear of these pictures keeps the temperature at a constant 50-60 degrees F, and I can make it warmer when I’m working. I went with this type of heater because there are no exposed heating elements to start a fire, and it uses less electricity.

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With the help of my friend, Collin Ludwig, we bagan framing in the walls of the 6 foot by 11 foot space that will become my all-weather garage workshop.

With the help of my friend, Collin Ludwig, we began framing in the walls of the 6 foot by 11 foot space that will become my all-weather garage workshop.  The garage is deep enough to get a car in between this structure and the garage door.

These walls will be insulated and then lined with plastic to help hold off the Minnesota winters.  Our temperatures here can sometimes get into double digits below zero.

These walls will have wallboard on the outside, and then be insulated and lined with plastic to help hold off the Minnesota winters. Our temperatures here can sometimes get into the double digits below zero.

An insulated, exterior door will help with the heating.

An insulated, exterior door will help with the heating.

A small oil-filled radiator will keep the temperature at a constant 60˚ Farenheit when I'm not in the workshop.  This will prevent damage to any of my paints.

A small oil-filled radiator will keep the temperature at a constant 60˚ Farhenheit when I’m not in the workshop. This will prevent damage to any of my paints.

The concrete floor is covered with quarter inch thick, interlocking rubber mats, and eight inch thick tempered masonite.

The concrete floor is covered with quarter inch thick, interlocking rubber mats, and eighth inch thick tempered hardboard. The hardboard will protect the mats, and give me a good smooth surface for the rolling office chair that I sit in when I work on small modeling projects. More to come…..

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